Archive for the 'canon eos 7d' Category

26
May
10

USB Dream (Canon 7D Short Film)

I was sent this video, and I have to say I was totally blown away.  It’s got one thing than many of the HDSLR videos don’t have and that’s a story.  This well executed little film comes to us from French HDSLR Shooters, Dark Light Studios.  Here’s more about USB DREAM.

In a near future, humanity uses modules allowing to acquire temporarily all kinds of knowledge. But this technological revolution hides some dark secrets…

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more about “USB Dream (Canon 7D Short Film)“, posted with vodpod

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25
May
10

Zacuto Does It Again…With The DSLR Z-Cage

Zacuto never ceases to amaze me with their new and innovative products, and the Z-Cage is no exception. This expandable, ergonomic and customizable stabilization system is the perfect, light weight system for the HDSLR. The big punch here is the base plate.  You adjust the height of the plate with the twist of a knob to accommodate all cameras even the 1D Mark IV or if you use a battery grip – nice!   Really, really nice –  the baseplate also has a quick release for your camera. This is huge if you want to shed the cage quickly and easily without hassling with a ¼ 20 connection. The cost, $827, and if you’ve owned Zacuto before, you know it’s worth every penny. Zacuto is now taking orders, and they estimate delivery in two or three weeks. You can find out more information at www.zacuto.com.

The Zacuto DSLR Z-Cage allows you to have a small, stable, and portable mounting solution for your DSLR and all of the accessories used with it. The Z-Cage allows you to gain a better form factor for holding the camera in your hands, thus giving you more stability when shooting and lots of options and space for all of your additional accessories such as an HD monitor, audio recorder and so forth. The Z-Cage uses our DSLR baseplate and our DSLR handles which are very durable and form fitting to your hands.

The DSLR baseplate is fully adjustable and expandable. You can adjust the height of the plate for compatibility with all DSLR cameras with and without battery grips simply by using the Allen screws on the front of the baseplate. The DSLR baseplate is also the platform for building your kit into a shoulder mounted rig. The plate also has multiple 1/2″ 13 threads on the sides so you can expand the cage into a shoulder mounted rig if you ever choose to change or create your own system.A huge advantage we have over competitors is that your camera can be quickly released from the rig by turning the red knob on the side of the DSLR baseplate then pulling up on your camera. The camera quick release plate stays mounted to your camera so you can quickly switch between using the camera as part of the cage or on its own. Your tripod plate mounts to the bottom of the plate by using the standard tripod screws, (2) ¼ 20” and (1) 3/8 16”. The 3.5″ rods on the front of the baseplate are perfect for mounting a follow focus or matte box. If you are using longer lenses, rod extensions might be needed.For mounting a small hd monitor as pictured, a monitor mount is needed.

24
May
10

Letus Announces New HDSLR Gear!

Got an email today from Letus introducing their line of gear for HDSLRs.  Without having seen these devices, I have to say I’m impressed.  I’m impressed with the restraint it must have taken to hold the individual configurations from the market place until they were all completed.  I’m also impressed with the build quality, if they are everything they appear to be, these should be some fine pieces of equipment.

The Letus Talon Series consists of 5 variations of rail system/viewfinder.  The “Talon K5”  (pictured) uses the extended base and Talon riser. This allows you to have a “step” in the telescoping support rods and includes a 90mm long stainless steel front rod extension. This is great for easily repositioning a follow focus or matte box when changing out lenses. The riser gives you more vertical clearance then you would have with a straight telescoping rod.  Cost:  $1384

The “Hawk” viewfinder is a radical new design and doesn’t resemble anything on the market.  According to Letus, “we were not satisfied with viewfinders on the market so using our knowledge of optics, we decided to build our own.”   Unlike others on the market, the Hawkeye uses totally custom optics designed and manufactured by Letus using 3 lenses in 2 groups rather than a single, off-the-shelf diopter.   Cost:  $385.

They even have a cage!   The Letus Talon DSLR cage has a releasable camera plate along with a sliding / removable top bridge. The camera plate can be attached from the bottom or the front of the cage for easy camera removal when transporting. The top bridge can slide on standard 15mm diameter rods.   Price:  $699.

You can find all of these items and their entire line of HDSLR gear at http://letusdslr.com/.

13
May
10

Philip Bloom on Lucasfilm’s Red Tails

Philip Bloom takes HDSLR filmmaking to the THE level – a George Lucas film.  For those of you who don’t know, Mr. Lucas has been talking about making a film about the Tuskegee Airmen since the early 80’s.  So for Philip Bloom to be a part of this monumental production is not only a testament to Bloom’s skills as a filmmaker but also to the legitimacy of the HDSLR revolution as well.

Philip shares all about his experiences  while on Mr. Lucas’ set on his blog here:

http://philipbloom.co.uk/2010/05/12/redtails/

He also shares some behind the scenes video from the set of of RED TAILS.

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02
May
10

macro:vision 001

This is the first of an upcoming series of macro visions on my blog. The clip shows you some carbonic acid bubbles with strange things of dish soap in a extraordinary environment. On the end, a spoon comes in and will destroy this little magical world. done with the canon eos 7d, EF-S 15-85 IS USM Kit lens with an macro lens.
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02
May
10

My Experience with Canon Tech Support

Last week, after taking several stills with my 7D and having shot with the 5D Mark II previously, I felt like I was really missing that extra something you can only find with the full frame sensor.  To be honest, I felt a little jaded too, as the E2i is essentially the 7D only lighter and 1k less.  Some colleagues of mine told me that the resell price would be determined by the shutter count.  However, they had no clue how to determine this.  So I scoured the net trying to find out how to find the shutter count.  There is some user-created software that claims to be able to determine the shutter count, but I couldn’t get it to even recognize my camera.  So I contacted Canon.

What I found out was more than just an answer to my questions, but a company that returned my emails by a real person.  They answered my questions very quickly and very clearly, as they have done since I purchased the camera 2 months ago.  I mention this not to ride Canon’s jock, but I work in a customer service driven industry myself, and I know how difficult it can be to answer the same questions over and over.  Questions regarding a feature, or questions that are not a clear warranty issue sometimes fall between the cracks.

Even if I do sell my 7D, I have to tell you, I will always be a Canon customer.  Their fast, informative and courteous responses have made a life long customer out of me, and I hope this story instills confidence in anyone thinking of buying an HDSLR from Canon.  Please see the email exchange below, with the answer for finding out the shutter count on a 7D.  Let me stress that these emails were answered within eight hours of when I sent them.

My First Email: Can you tell me how I can check the shutter count on my 7D? I’m thinking of reselling it, and I’m told they need the shutter count.

Canon’s Response: We appreciate your continued correspondence regarding your EOS 7D. I am > sorry to hear that you aren’t happy with your 7D.  If you have taken less than 9,999 shots and have not reset the file numbering you can determine the number of pictures by looking at the file number of your last picture. If you have taken over 9,999 shots or reset the file numbering (this also occurs after 9,999 pictures), only the service center can determine the number of shutter actuations.  I hope this helps. Please write to us again if you have any questions.  Sincerely, Erik Technical Support Representative.
My Second Email: How many shots do I have until the stability of the shutter is questionable?

Canon’s Response: The shutter has a listed durability rating of 150,000 shutter cycles. A shutter cycle is defined as a single full opening, closing and re-cocking of the shutter mechanism. I hope this information is helpful to you. Please let us know if we can be of any further assistance with your EOS 7D.  Thank you for choosing Canon.  Sincerely,  Dirk  Technical Support Representative.

01
May
10

SneakGeekZ Reviews the LCDVF Using Canon EOS 7D

http://videodawgz.com SneakGeekZ Reviews the LCDVF Using Canon EOS 7D http://SneakGeekZ.tv

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